Category: Little Photos

Autumn in Canons Ashby

While Summer is by far my favourite season, Autumn is dear to me too.  As mentioned, I love the rich changes of the colours of the leaves.  It’s nature weaving out its magic in its finest, isn’t it?  What’s not to love about Autumn?  Yes, it’s definitely colder, but it’s also an excuse to wear lovely chunky knits, and warm over-sized coats!

We went over to Beds to see family during the half-term break.  It was also T’s grandfather’s 90th birthday.  We’re pleased to see him really well and strong in mind.  He has a youthfulness which I hope will always stay with him.

While over there, we also had the chance to visit Canons Ashby, a National Trust house in a small village with the same name as the property.  Built in the 16th century, it’s been home to the Dryden family for over 400 years.

Highlights from the visit – finding medieval doodles on the wall.

According to one of the guides there, in the 80s, when this particular bedroom was stripped off its rotting panels, they found lovely etchings that dates to medieval times.  If you peer at the photo above closely, you’ll see a child-like doodle of a girl obviously made by a child.  The next ones (as seen on photos below) were obviously done by someone older.

All on this wall:

T enjoyed poking about in the small rooms in the house.

While Canons Ashby doesn’t have a large garden like the other National Trust properties, it was still a joy to walk on, or in T’s case, skip about.

The vibrant autumn colours were in full boom in Canons Ashby.

We also visited the13th century Abbey nearby.

Like all National Trust properties, the place is steeped in history.  Our link to the past, or if you’re an 8-year-old little girl like T, a place to skip and jump about.

So far, I haven’t visited any National Trust or English Heritage property and was disappointed in the end…. Have you?  Do share.

Autumn Photographs

It’s been a while since I took my camera out for a spin.  Did just that today.  It started out in the garden and then T, Doc and I decided to go over the neighbouring field for more photos.

Scenes from our garden:

 

“It looked like the world was covered in a cobbler of crust of brown sugar and cinnamon” – Sarah Addison Allen, First Frost

 

A touch of colour (photo above) and bat girl and her dog in the field beside our house.

Don’t you just love autumn photographs?

The Flowers of Castle Drogo

I must have flowers, always and always.  – Claude Monet

And it’s no wonder that the famous the French artist went on and created paintings of them one after the other.  I’m no artist.  I knew that as an early child when mum hired a local artist to teach my brother and I how to paint. He did well.  I did not. I cannot paint flowers but I can certainly photograph them.

But my rose, all on her own, is more important than all of you together, since she’s the one I’ve watered. Since she’s the one I put under glass, since she’s the one I sheltered behind the screen. Since she’s the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except the two or three butterflies). Since she’s the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she’s my rose.”

― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

I have a friend who can name every single flower there is.  She tried to teach me once, but I’m afraid my memory retention is bad and it’s only going to get worse (hopefully not!), so I’m afraid I won’t be able to name any of the flowers above apart from the roses.  After all, who can’t?

These beautiful flowers can be found in Castle Drogo in Devon. They were taken in the summer so I’m not sure if they’ll be as colourful and beautiful as they were in those photos, but still worth a visit.  The castle is still surrounded by scaffolding but the gardens are definitely worth visiting especially if you love flowers.  If you find yourself in the area, do drop by and visit the flowers of Castle Drogo.  They have wonderful grounds too, perfect for autumn walks.

What about you?

Are you good at identifying flowers?

Our 2018 Summer in Photos (Part 1)

Hello again.  It’s been a while since I’ve last posted anything here on Little Steps. I’ll be honest, I’ve lost my blogging mojo and I’ve been trying to get it back.  In the mean time, I’ll try to say it in photos and hopefully the words will come…

Porthleven

Perranporth Beach in the fog:

And then the fog lifted …

To be continued…

Evidence of Spring

I’m cold as soon as I get up in the morning.  I’m missing our warm-terraced house in Bos.  This 400-year-old detached house surrounded by farmland, although lovely, is bloody too cold!  As soon as T is eating breakfast, I dive back into the duvet before jumping out again and helping her get ready for school.  I’ve had enough of this cold weather.  I’m desperate for the warmth and the sun, while summer is far off, I’ll settle for spring.

We had a burst of good weather last Sunday and the husband took this opportunity to chop off the tree that fell a few days ago because of really strong winds last week, although it was cold, I decided to join him and T out for some fresh air.   I also took my camera out to take some photos:

T had fun jumping in her trampoline.  She hasn’t played out here in awhile.

Wearing her current favourite jumper in the world.

I was so pleased to see so much green coming around, a cheery contrast to the drabness of the winter trees.  It made me happy to find spring flowers finally sprouting out in our garden.

And who doesn’t love snowdrops?

As you can see, there’s a snowdrop reunion happening on the side of our house.  Aren’t they the loveliest?

I think spring is slowly creeping in in spite the cold weather.

What’s your favourite spring flower?

I love snowdrops, bluebells and daffodils.

What about you?

A Summer Hangover in Photos

O, sunlight!  The most precious gold to be found on earth.” – Roman Payne

We woke up to autumn shaking us with its dreary, wet and cold hands yesterday.  While it isn’t wet today, it’s still the same overcast morning, I’m still suffering from a terrible summer hangover.  The kind you wouldn’t necessarily want to shake off.  In that note, I’m heading off to lala land courtesy of the photos I took of those glorious days of summer.  Come and join me!

 Buckfast Abey in all its glory.

Little T saying a prayer/wish.  I bet she was praying for more toys 😉

 

And just like that, summer left us through that ancient window …

Why is summer mist romantic and autumn mist so sad? – Dodie Smith

Inanimate Objects

Nothing is inanimate, what is the rest is our interpretation.

– Dejan Stojanovic, The Sun Watches the Sun

A glass dove.

A Victorian rocking horse.

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A stack of books.

He had insisted that inanimate objects couldn’t have malignant motivations, but Emma had extensive proof to the contrary. – Lauren Willig, The Garden Intrigue.

 I like going around the house taking photos of anything that catches my eye.

Do you do this too?

A Walk in Photos

St. George’s flag was flying proudly up Forrarbury church as Doc and I walked towards it last Sunday.  Oh yes, I remembered, it was after all St. George’s day the day before that.

The last time we were out, I noticed some lovely bluebells strewn all over the grass near Forrarbury church.  I made a mental note to come back with my camera, but never did.

Luckily when we came back, the bluebells were still around.

Aren’t they the loveliest?  After a few snaps, Doc and I went ahead with our walk and found this bunny rabbit on the cemetery grounds.

Someone must have left it there for a love one.  Doc and I went to our usual jaunt on the headland at this point, I had to put my camera back in my bag.  It was a weekend and there were a lot of dog-walkers out and this meant, I couldn’t let Doc off his leash.  He gets too excited when there are others, especially since some of them had their little toddlers in tow.  I didn’t want to frighten the little ones with an over-excited friendly dog running up to them, even if it’s just to say hi.

Once back on the road, I did manage a few measly shots.

When we first moved down to Cornwall, I used to wonder why some of the trees were odd-shaped looking, as if they were slanting.  Then I realised the trees are slanting because of the harsh Cornish wind.  I find it fascinating.  You’ll find slanting trees  dotted all over the Cornish coast.

Have you ever seen trees slanting trees in your area?

Do share.

A Country Kids Post: The Graveyard Seekers

Little T loves skeletons, Monster High Dolls, Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas and the Corpse’s Bride and her current favourite book is Goth Girl.  She also happens to love graveyards. She likes visiting them and walking around and trying to read their names.  When I tell her that it’s time to walk hDoc, she will always say “Can we go through the graveyard mum?”  I always sigh and give in.  This time though to make it somehow a little bit more fun, I told her to look for the oldest gravestone she could find.

First, she spied the tulips and wanted to smell the flowers.

The she found this lovely stone sculpture on one of the graves.

She looked around.

And around.

Then we found this 1786 headstone.  I actually know that there are older graves than this one, inside Forrarbury church which some parts of it dates back to the Norman times.  But I didn’t want to mention this to T.  I wanted to walk the dog and go home. so mum stayed mum.

To be fair though, I do like graveyards too, especially here in England, they are so interesting, just don’t ask me to explore it at night.

What about you?

Do you like them too, or do you find them too grim?

Do share.